Library Loot

Even though I have a tower of library books next to my bed and an entire shelf devoted to the 20 Books of Summer, once again I couldn’t resist grabbing a few more books from the library. As you can see, it’s all backlist stuff so it’s perfect for my “About Time I Read It” series.

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by the above-mentioned Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write-up your post, steal the Library Loot pic and link your post using the Mr. Linky on Claire’s blog.

Sadly, when it comes to books especially library books I have no self-control. Well, I guess all I can do right now is get back to reading.

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Three More Coming Attractions

Sadly, I failed miserably this week to crank out a brief review or two. Nevertheless, I’m confident you’ll start seeing some new posts before you know it. But until then, here’s yet another preview post to tide you over.

How Democracies Die by Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt – Everywhere one looks, from Eastern Europe to Latin America to these United States democracy looks besieged. Here’s how it happened and what we can do to reverse the trend.

Devil’s Game: How the United States Helped Unleash Fundamentalist Islam by Robert Dreyfuss – Remember, it wasn’t that long ago left-leaning, secularist ideologies like Communism, Pan-Arabism and  Palestinian nationalism were the rage throughout the Arab and Muslim world and  threatened to overthrow the status quo. In response the United States and, to a lesser degree Great Britain turned to Islamist groups or Islamic-oriented regimes like Saudi Arabia and Pakistan to stem their rising tides.

The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam by Douglas Murray – The second of my 20 Books of Summer. This one might have been a slight disappointment, but first let me reflect upon Murray’s words before I make my final pronouncement.

 

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Three More Coming Attractions

Well, it’s officially summer here in the Northern Hemisphere. I’m happy to report we’ve had some nice weather of late and that’s made it easier to read outside, be it at the park, on my porch or hanging out on the outdoor patio at my local watering hole. Once again I’m behind in my blogging but at least I’ve been a productive reader. Below are three books, of which one is fiction. All three are historical in nature. Two out of the three deal with the Holocaust and one covers the early Cold War period.

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Library Loot

Even though I’m trying to focus my attention on my 20 Books of Summer, I could not resist grabbing more books when I dropped by the public library this week. As you can see it’s a nice mix of history, politics, current events and religion. If you’re no stranger to my blog you should know this is my kind of stuff.

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by the above-mentioned Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write-up your post, steal the Library Loot pic and link your post using the Mr. Linky on Claire’s blog.

If you ask me I’d say this is a nice assortment of books. I can’t wait to dive in.

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Three More Coming Attractions

Even though I’ve emerged from my blogging slump there’s still a lot of work left to be done. So, until I can crank out a post or two or three, here’s three more coming attractions. Just like the books in my earlier post, all three are works of nonfiction courtesy of my local public library.

Day of Empire: How Hyperpowers Rise to Global Dominance–and Why They Fall by Amy Chua – When most people think of  Amy Chua, they associate her with from her controversial best-seller Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother but I discovered Chua in 2016 when I read her 2014 book  The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America.While reading it, Day of Empire didn’t hugely impress me. However, after finishing it Chua’s book keeps growing on me. And that’s a never a bad sign.

The Taste of Ashes: The Afterlife of Totalitarianism in Eastern Europe by Marci Shore – Since I love reading stuff on Eastern Europe I couldn’t resist grabbing this one. While I can’t call her 2013 effort uneven, there are parts of her book I enjoyed and other parts I did not. The Taste of Ashes nevertheless is sophisticated and detailed. This thinking person’s guide to Eastern Europe did not leave me disappointed.

Seminary Boy by John Cornwell – Considering my fondness for religious memoirs it was a no-brainer I’d grab this one sooner or later after seeing it on the library shelf. Cornwell recalls his childhood growing up in a poor Anglo-Irish home and the time he spent in a British minor seminary (a kind of Catholic boarding school to prepare boys for the priesthood) and the many struggles and relationships he experienced along the way.

 

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Library Loot

For a long time, Library Loot was a regular feature on my blog. Almost every week I would report to the world which books I grabbed from the public library, and in turn link that post on another book blogger’s page. This arrangement not only helped my readers get a glimpse into what I hoped to read over the coming weeks, it also gave me the opportunity to see what other book bloggers planned on reading. I discovered many a great book thanks to this little meme, including Keith Lowe’s Savage Continent: Europe in the Aftermath of World War II, since it was a Library Loot posting on Claire’s blog The Captive Reader that first brought Lowe’s book to my attention. But sadly, I fell out of the habit of doing Library Loot posts.

Even though I’m trying to focus my attention on my 20 Books of Summer, I could not resist these three books and simply had to grab them at the library this afternoon.

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by the above-mentioned Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write-up your post, steal the Library Loot pic and link your post using the Mr. Linky on Linda’s blog.

Well, there it is. Still more reading ahead of me. If I make it though only one of these of books I’ll consider it a major accomplishment. So with that in mind, maybe I need to wrap up this long overdue Library Loot post and get back to reading.

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Three More Coming Attractions

Well, I think I might be out of my blogging slump. Be that as it may, I keep finishing books and that of course means I keep falling behind in my blogging. So, until I can crank out new posts, here’s three more coming attractions to hold you over. As you can see they’re all works of nonfiction. I’m happy to report I enjoyed all three books.

A Secret Life: The Polish Colonel, His Covert Mission, And The Price He Paid To Save His Country by Benjamin Weiser – Yet another excellent book I discovered thanks to my local public library. I love stuff like this dealing with the 70 and 80s Cold War.

The Less You Know, The Better You Sleep: Russia’s Road to Terror and Dictatorship under Yeltsin and Putin by David Satter – Freaky scary exposé of domestic black ops in post-Soviet Russia.

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann – I love when a book lives up to all the hype. Murder, mayhem, corruption, racism, and old-school gumshoe detective work. There’s a good chance this one makes my year-end Best Nonfiction List. Damn near impossible to put down!

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