A Trio of Books About China

As the year draws to a close and I frantically try to review, no matter how briefly, as many books as possible I noticed three of the books I’ve been wanting to write about deal with China. All three are backlist titles and I found them at my public library. The first one, Fortunate Sons, deals with China’s past while the second, Michael Levy’s memoir Kosher Chinese deals with everyday life as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English in China’s interior region during the mid 2000s, while the third Age of Ambition is a collection of interviews with a wide array of Chinese individuals and their ambitions to succeed in today’s ascendant China. If I group these books together to me it begins to resemble a play in three acts: China’s past, it’s transition and it’s present.

  • Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization by Liel Leibowitz and Matthew Miller – I’ve been wanting to read this one since 2011 when it was published. For centuries China was the richest and most powerful kingdom on earth. But by the 19th century, China found itself eclipsed by the industrializing powers of Europe. In hopes of catching up, China needed to learn from the West. Dozens of young Chinese men were sent to American high schools and top-flight universities like Harvard and Yale to learn science, engineering, mathematics and such in hopes of returning China educated men who could jump-start the backwards country. This is a pretty good book and it taught me more than a few things. (For instance, I learned in China’s Taiping Rebellion, waged roughly around the time of the American Civil War, close to 30 million died.)
  • Kosher Chinese: Living, Teaching, and Eating with China’s Other Billion by Michael Levy – Like Ken Silverstein’s Turkmeniscam and Walter Kirn’s Lost in the Meritocracy this is a backlist title I’d never heard of till I saw it at on a library shelf. Levy was teaching in America in the early 2000s when, in the wake of 9-11 he wanted to do something significant with his life. His solution was to join the Peace Corps, earning him a stint teaching English at a third tier college in Guiyang, an out-of-the-way town deep in China’s interior. I was pleasantly surprised by this memoir and found its combination of humor, honesty and slice of Chinese life a light and enjoyable read.
  • Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China by Evan Osnos -This book won the National Book Award, the Pulitzer AND an Economist magazine’s best book of the year. It deserves all the awards. Osnos spent close to a decade interviewing Chinese citizens and learning their hopes and dreams. (Who knew there’s a thing in China called “Crazy English” in which you learn English by yelling it.) Not only is this one of the best books I’ve read this year it’s one of the best books about China I’ve read.

In retrospect, for me 2018 has been a year for reading about China. In addition to the three above-mentioned books I also read Paul French’s Midnight in Peking: How the Murder of a Young Englishwoman Haunted the Last Days of Old China as well as Robert Kaplan’s East Asia-centric Asia’s Cauldron: The South China Sea and the End of a Stable Pacific. After getting a taste of these kind of books I think in 2019 I’d like to read more.

5 thoughts on “A Trio of Books About China

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