Among the Living by Jonathan Rabb

It was hard to resist Jonathan Rabb’s novel Among the Living when I came across a copy last week at my public library. What could be more intriguing than a 30-something Holocaust survivor thrust into the Jim Crow world of Savannah, Georgia?

Among the Living begins in 1947 with the arrival in Savannah of Czech Jew Yitzhak Goldah. After surviving the horrors of the Holocaust he comes to live with his American relatives, Abe and Pearl Jesler, a middle-aged childless couple. Despite their initial awkwardness the Jeslers welcome Yitzhak with open arms, not only providing him with employment but also introducing him to their friends, business associates and fellow members of city’s Jewish community. Thankful nonetheless for the Jesler’s hospitality and with it a chance to restart his life, Yitzhak soon learns the city is riven both racially and religiously. As an outsider who’s experienced firsthand the racist atrocities of the murderous Nazis he must learn how to navigate the circumscribed worlds of white and black. If that isn’t challenging enough, even Savannah’s Jewish population is fractured with the city’s Conservative and Reform communities having little, if anything to do with each other. This animosity becomes apparent when he attracts the attention of an intelligent and beautiful young widow from the city’s Reform congregation.

Overall, I enjoyed Among the Living and now I want to read more of Rabb’s fiction, especially his historical thriller Rosa. (Come to think of it, for that matter his entire Nikolai Hoffner series.) It’s also rekindled my interest in reading Ghita Schwarz’s 2010 novel Displaced Persons because it also features Holocaust survivors. Perhaps sometime in the near future you’ll see a few of these novels featured on my blog.

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2 Comments

Filed under Fiction, History

2 responses to “Among the Living by Jonathan Rabb

  1. What an interesting concept! I just watched the new Netflix movie “Mudbound” (after reading the book years ago) and feel there are similarities–post WWII in the south with people returning to Jim Crow laws after seeing a different life in Europe.

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