Pan-European Lives: Dark Voyage by Alan Furst

Dark VoyageAs any of my longtime readers will attest, I love the novels of Alan Furst. Over the last couple of years I’ve devoured almost the novels of his extensive Night Soldiers series. Expertly researched and well written, Furst’s novels capture atmosphere and tension-filled drama of Europe on the precipice of war or during the early years of World War II before the Allied Invasion. With just a handful of books left in the series I haven’t read, my goal for 2017 is the read those last remaining novels. Those happen to be Dark Voyage, Dark Star, Red Gold and his most recent offering A Hero of France. So with that in mind, my first step in accomplishing this goal began when I cracked open my hand me down copy of Furst’s Dark Voyage, 

Just like all the other novels in Furst’s Night Soldiers series, Dark Voyage follows what’s become for me a familiar template. Set during the years leading up to, or the early years of WWII, a middle-aged gentleman of Continental extraction finds himself battling the Nazis as part of one secretive plot after another. Almost always, he’s never a spy or intelligence operative in the traditional sense, but instead some sort of professional who’s been pressed into the role by the Brits, Americans or their allies. In the case of Dark Voyage, it’s the adventures of Dutchman Eric DeHaan, Captain of the Noordendam. One night while in port in Morocco, Captain DeHaan is told by agents of the Dutch military in exile that his ship has been loaned to the British navy for secret military operations. Covertly repainted and renamed the Santa Rosa and now sailing under the flag of neutral Spain, DeHaan takes the battered freighter from the Mediterranean to the Baltic. With him is a diverse multinational cast of crew and passengers resembling a microcosm of Europe and the Mediterranean including a Greek stowaway, a German Jew, two spies (one working for the British, the other a Russian on the run from Stalin’s secret police) assorted Dutch, Germans and Spaniards, and an Egyptian Copt radio operator.

For whatever reason, this wasn’t one of my favorite Furst novel, but nevertheless I enjoyed it. Since my goal is to finish out the series before the end of 2017 it’s a sure bet you’ll see a few other Alan Furst novel’s featured on my blog.

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4 Comments

Filed under Eastern Europe/Balkans, Europe, Fiction, History, Middle East/North Africa

4 responses to “Pan-European Lives: Dark Voyage by Alan Furst

  1. This sounds interesting. I think I’ve only read one Furst novel, though I have several on the shelf. I better get reading.

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