Midnight’s Furies by Nisid Hajari

Midnight's Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India's PartitionWhen it comes to the world of nonfiction, I think every author wants to write a book that’s well-written, well-researched and filled with fascinating details. I’m sure many of those authors as they strive to incorporate as much detail as possible into their books have to make sure they don’t include too much information. Even though I appreciate great research and strong scholarship, the inclusion of too much detail can mar a promising work of nonfiction. While many praised Sheri Fink’s Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital I was not one of them. Impressed as I was by project she undertook, I thought she included too many details and her book could have used a little editing. On a related note, I’m starting to feel the same way about Mark Molesky’s This Gulf of Fire: The Destruction of Lisbon, or Apocalypse in the Age of Science and Reason. (It’s taken me forever to work my way through Molesky’s 2015 book.) The trick is to include just the right amount of detail without overloading the reader.

Nisid Hajari, with his 2015 book Midnight’s Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India’s Partition pulls this off with flying colors. Not only is Midnight’s Furies well-written and well-researched it has a ton of detail. But not too much detail. That my friends, is the beauty of a book like Midnight’s Furies.

Midnight’s Furies is one of those books I saw featured on Amazon or Goodreads and vowed to someday read. When I found an available copy thanks to my public library I grabbed it. Despite making the mistake of trying to read it while I was reading several other books I eventually powered my way through it. In the end was not disappointed.

After reading several books, both fiction and nonfiction dealing with the Indian Partition, I considered myself pretty knowledgeable when it came to one of modern history’s bloodiest ethnic exchanges. I’m pleased to say Hajari’s book taught me much and helped give me a deeper understanding of not just how the Partition unfolded but what caused it. And all of it made for excellent reading.

According to Hajari, if British India was going to be split into two nations, it was going to be one hell of a mess. Mohammad Ali Jinnah and his followers knew Pakistan could not exist as a viable state without the major population regions of Punjab and Bengal. Even splitting both regions between India and Pakistan would leave huge numbers of Muslims in India and Hindus and Sikhs in Pakistan. These sizable minorities would need to be protected or relocated peacefully. (In the end, neither happened and the result was horrific.) With huge numbers of Sikhs forced from their homes in East Punjab many felt cheated by Pakistan, but also by India for not allowing them to set up their own independent  Sikhistan. Angry but also well-armed, well-organized and possessing a long martial tradition, the Sikh community’s ability to project deadly force added to the bloodbath. On top of it all, both Pakistan and India coveted the lovely Kashmir. India would outmaneuver Pakistan for the lion’s share of this prize. But by doing so would sow the seeds of an ongoing conflict that plagues India to this day.

Midnight’s Furies is an excellent book and must reading for anyone wanting to understand today’s rivalry between Pakistan and India. Consider this book highly recommended.

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6 Comments

Filed under Area Studies/International Relations, History, Indian Subcontinent

6 responses to “Midnight’s Furies by Nisid Hajari

  1. Lata Sunil

    Thats a lovely review and makes me want to read it right away. Adding it to my TBR.

  2. I only knew a rough outline of the story of Partition, and a few one-off details that I’d picked up and they stuck with me (like I knew about death trains). So reading this was super informative, and it made me want to do more reading about this period.

  3. I don’t really know a lot about Partition which is fortunately not hampering my current reading of Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, but I still want to know more and this book sounds good. Last year, I did a bit of research about the history of Bangladesh (formerly East Pakistan) and learned about the “Stranded Pakistanis” and some of the horrors that preceded and followed the founding of Bangladesh.

    • I have Midnight’s Children in my personal library and started it once, but never finished it. Perhaps it’s high time I did. If you wanna read an excellent book on the birth of Bangladesh, I highly recommend The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger, and a Forgotten Genocide. It is superb.
      Thanks for dropping by and commenting! Please visit again!

  4. Pingback: 2016 In Review: My Favorite Nonfiction | Maphead's Book Blog

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