About Time I Read It: The Twilight Warriors by Robert Gandt

9780767932417_p0_v1_s192x300I have a feeling when looking back on 2015 I’ll probably consider it as the year I made a strong push to read books from my personal library that I’d been meaning to read for a long, long time. Like dominos falling, one by one I whipped through Spilllover, Sacred Trash, The Myth of the Muslim Tide, Bloodlands and Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World. Each one of these books I thoroughly enjoyed. So much so I felt like kicking myself for not reading them sooner.

Well, add one more title to that parade of excellent books. Robert Gandt’s The Twilight Warriors has been on my shelf for five years, ever since it came in the mail as one of my default selections from the History Book Club. However, even after seeing praised online I made no effort to read it. Then one day, perhaps feeling inspired to read yet another ignored book in my personal library I picked it up. Holy cow, it’s good. Once again, I found myself asking why oh why did I wait so long to read this terrific book.

The Twilight Warriors is Gandt’s fast-paced chronicle of the Battle of Okinawa. Fought during the waning months of the Second World War, the Americans saw the conquest of Okinawa as the first step towards the eventual invasion of the Japanese home islands. The Japanese, fully aware of the island’s significance, heavily fortified it in addition to deploying heavy artillery. On top of that, the Japanese planned to unleash its newest weapon, the kamikaze upon the American Navy. Lastly, the pride of the Japanese fleet, the Yamato, the world’s largest battleship, stood by and awaited its final mission.

In the end, both sides shed unfathomable amounts of blood for nothing. The Japanese, despite waves of deadly kamikaze attacks and their dogged resistance on Okinawa were unable to inflict enough casualties to force America to the negotiating table in hopes of securing a truce, as opposed to the unconditional surrender they horribly feared. As for the Americans, once Japan quickly surrender after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there was no need to use Okinawa as a jumping off point for an invasion of Japan.

This is a very good book. Not only is it fast-paced, but it’s also well-written. From what I can tell, Gandt did a heck of a good job researching The Twilight Warriors. Perhaps above all, I really liked how the story is told mainly from the perspective of those men who did the fighting. Therefore, it’s for these reasons I have no problem whatsoever recommended this superb book.

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Filed under East Asia, History, Japan

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