Africa Reading Challenge: The Shadow of the Sun by Ryszard Kapuscinski

The Shadow of the SunA few years ago, Kinna hosted the Africa Reading Challenge. As one would probably guess, its purpose was to inspire people to read books about Africa, set in Africa and or by African authors. Knowing a good reading challenge when I see one, I happily signed up. Over the course of that year I read a number of qualifying books. Per the challenge’s guidelines I chose a mixture of fiction and nonfiction, representing or dealing with in some way nations from across the continent. And many, both fiction and nonfiction were by African-born writers. Looking back, I’d have to say it was rewarding experience and I had fun participating.

After the challenge took a brief hiatus, Kinna resurrected it at the beginning of this year. Once I heard the good news I eagerly signed up. Then, just like I do with so many other challenges, promptly forgot about it. So much for me knowing a good reading challenge when I see one.

But fear not, all is not forgotten. Let me present my first contribution to the Africa Reading Challenge. Ryszard Kapuscinski’s The Shadow of the Sun recalls the four decades he spent crisscrossing the continent as a foreign correspondent. Because of his insistence in engaging Africa on its own terms – that is traveling by crowded bus, staying in spartan accommodations and venturing where most Westerners would fear to tread – we are treated to visions of Africa not seen in travel magazines or the evening news.

We when we think of foreign correspondents, we usually envision an intrepid American or British fellow hopping from one global hotspot to another.  Not so with Kapuscinski. He was a Pole. When he started his journalistic career back in the 50s, his employer was Poland’s Soviet-aligned  Communist government. (A few years ago speculation was ripe he collaborated to some degree with Poland’s intelligence services.) But according to Kapuscinski, no matter where he went in Africa, because of his skin color Africans assumed he was a wealthy European, regardless of his nation’s ruling ideology.

Partly because Kapuscinski’s Communist employers paid him very little and partly because of his a habit of living and traveling like a local, Kapuscinski experienced more than his share of hair-raising adventures. He battled malaria, had his travel documents held hostage by hostile warlords, risked thirst and exposure after being stranded in the desert, watched his modest living quarters burglarized on a nightly basis and narrowly escaped being bitten be a deadly cobra. But in spite of all the dangers he survived and wrote about the continent’s coups, civil wars, corrupt officials and diverse cultures. And most of all, because he lived and traveled like a local, he also wrote about Africa’s everyday people.

This is a pretty good book for anyone who wants to learn about Africa, but might not know where to start. Although he ignores almost all of North Africa and all of South Africa, the rest of the continent gets a pretty in-depth treatment. I guess my only complaint with The Shadow of the Sun is sometimes Kapuscinski can be a bit long-winded with his commentary. Some readers might also take issue with his particular take on local politics and cultures, accusing him of Western bias. But that’s an issue I’ll let more astute bloggers tackle.

With The Shadow of the Sun under my belt, I hope to read a few more Africa related books. Kinna’s African Reading Challenge is a great one. It would be a shame not to take advantage of it.

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5 Comments

Filed under Africa, Area Studies/International Relations, History, Memoir

5 responses to “Africa Reading Challenge: The Shadow of the Sun by Ryszard Kapuscinski

  1. I have this one one my reading list and your review makes me even more excited to read it. I think I haven’t gotten to it because it covers a whole bunch of African countries instead of just one!

  2. joyweesemoll

    Hopping over from the Nonfiction Reading Challenge…

    This sounds interesting. A journalist who travels like a local would really be able to get in all the nooks and crannies of a culture.

    • He does. Since he traveled and lived like the locals I believe he was able to experience, and in the end understand those cultures to a greater degree than most foreign correspondents.
      Thanks for dropping by joy!! Nice to hear from you!!!

  3. Last December (2016), I shared with my husband that I wanted to make 2017 the year of reading all of Kapuszinski’s translated books. This review reminded me that I really do want to accomplish that task. My guess is that he opted to travel and write about the middle band of Africa because, at that time, most of the world was hearing about countries in North Africa and South Africa. There is something special about how Kapuscinski writes and maintains its integrity post-translation. I believe that you captured it with this review. Thank you for sharing it.

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