About Time I Read It: Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier

For years I’ve owned a copy of Tracy Chevalier’s best-selling novel Girl With a Pearl Earring and like countless other books in my personal library I’ve never read it. But about a week ago I was seized by the urge to finally read Chevalier’s novel. Not only have I been craving fiction, but I’ve also been itching to read more books from my personal collection, as opposed to reading stuff from the public library. So after hearing a well-read co-worker praise the book one afternoon I figured it was time at last to give Girl with a Pearl Earring a chance. After a slow start (mostly because I was trying to read several other books at the same I time) I quickly finished it. And I have to say I enjoyed it.

Since it’s a well-known novel I won’t say much about the plot, except it’s set in 17th century Holland and revolves around Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer and his household. It’s told from the perspective of his housemaid, a young but surprisingly intelligent girl from a recently impoverished family. As the story unfolds we catch glimpses of class differences, religious tension, gender inequality, sexual awakenings, jealousy and of course painting.

As I mentioned earlier, I liked Chevalier’s novel. Her writing is good and I thought she did a fine job capturing the young protagonist’s voice. The story seemed to flow nicely with the characters seeming believable and quite capable of holding my interest. Looking back on the novel I have no complaints. Who knows, maybe this fine novel will help inspire me to read more fiction. I guess only time will tell.

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6 Comments

Filed under Fiction, History

6 responses to “About Time I Read It: Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier

  1. JoV

    Refreshing to see you review a fiction and break all the stereotype to think you may have this one on your shelf! I came across this book time again but I have yet to read anything from Tracey Chevalier. One day….

  2. Kimberly Heggen

    Love this book. Read it first in paper, now own it as an e-book. A delicately told story that brings me back every now and again to re-read it.

  3. Pingback: 2012 Challenges Summary: BA’s Off the Shelf Reading Challenge « Bookish Ardour

  4. Pingback: Vermeer’s Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World | Maphead's Book Blog

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