A tale of two Israelis

Since the last book I featured on my blog

was written by
an Israel-based journalist, perhaps it's only fitting that my next two
books were written by a pair of Isaelis. One written by a leading
Israeli investigative journalist, chronicles Israel's 30 years of cloak
and dagger operations in the espionage war against Iran. The other
book, written by a former Soviet dissident turned Israeli politician
and cabinet member, explores the differences between free societies and
authoritarian or "fear" societies. I enjoyed both books. Both were very
readable, considering Ronen Bergman's book The Secret War with Iran was translated from Modern Hebrew into English and Natan Sharansky, the author of The Case For Democracy:The Power of Freedom to Overcome Tyranny and Terror,
grew up speaking Russian ( although he learned English in college and
actually taught his fellow dissidents the language during his days as a "Refusnik" in the former Soviet Union) he nevertheless wrote the book in English.
   
Skipping to the "brief executive summary" regarding the two books,
there's enough covert action in Ronen's book to inspire three or four
Tom Clancy novels and perhaps even several action-packed motion
pictures, (case in point, remember that mysterious "complex" in Syria
that was bombed by the Israeli Airforce a few years ago, well it wasn't
a harmless business park in the middle of the desert, hint hint).
Sharansky's book is almost two books, the first part an essay on the
nature of freedom seen through his experience as an inprisoned Soviet
dissident and the second part his analysis of the Israeli-Palestinian
"peace process" and his frustrations with Arafat and the various
shortcomings of the Palestinian Authority.  Instead of boring you with
my opinions on this, follow my links to Sharansky's book on Amazon and read some of the reviews. The debate is excellent and covers the political spectrum.

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